Saturday, March 31, 2012

storyboarding part II


I've sat through the credits of a number of video games in order to watch a final section not available until the game was finished. (No, I don't play them but I live with a fairly skillful gamer.) One thing I've noticed is that at the end of video games or even very short animations there are a whole host of people named who contributed to the end result. The short animations usually have a limited list of contributors as would be expected with a film that lasts five minutes or less, but it's remarkable that these things are rarely done by just one person. However, studio productions of full length movie cartoons, Studio Ghibli, for instance, will list more artists than actors in an average live action major film. It always amazes me.


Now I'm involved in my own small scale production of drawing and writing a story I'd like to read and can see for myself just how complicated the process can be. Should I draw and paint a few highly detailed pictures and write the rest or should I plan on letting more and simpler pictures tell the story? So far I'm still compiling sketches that aren't in much of a linear order but you'll see a few ideas are developing. I spent an afternoon this week writing out a plot summary that may have a climax that's too overblown for the intended length of the tale, meaning I'd have to add much more to the middle. I'm not sure I want to write an illustrated novel either, so for the moment my character is standing at a gate wondering about that next step.

Back to the drawing board.

Meanwhile, here's another little movie I found:



It's not what we have so much as what we make of what we have.

18 comments:

Life As I Know It Now said...

The easiest way, it seems to me, is to have the story mostly written out punctuated with pictures that highlight memorable or highly dramatic moments. Good luck with your project.

Rob-bear said...

Storyboards usually need most of the main pictures of the project, though not in a whole lot of detail. Pretty much what you're doing, but in the order of the plot.

I hope you keep having fun with what you are doing. And yes, it's what you do with what you've got.

Blessings and Bear hugs.

marja-leena said...

I adore your sketches, and I'm sure story and images will fall into place as you work on it.

And the video is beautiful. I was particularly struck by the character's lovely fingers - such image making skills!

susan said...

I'm closing in on just sitting down to write now that I can see the story.. or most of it. Doing the quick sketches has been very helpful.

Thanks so much for your good wishes.

susan said...

Ah yes, but they are in order in my mind. It's just I tend to find a space on whatever page is open at the time. I'm going to be writing next and then I'll pick up with more detailed pictures.

I think hard work and fun can often be interchangeable concepts. Thanks, Rob.

susan said...

I do think they're coming together with each passing day. After all, two weeks ago I didn't even know I was going to try.

I'm glad you liked the video. I was also very impressed with how tenderly the character was modeled.

Randal Graves said...

Oh sure you want to write an illustrated novel, of course you do. Since a picture is worth a thousand words, 80 pictures equals publishing house thumbs up. Oh crap, I just used math. Jake says ewww.

clairesgarden said...

thats lovely.

Spadoman said...

I love your sketches. You would do very well as a storyboard artist. (another career). The short video reminded me of a trip to the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota a few years back. I was talking to a man that was selling dream catchers and other small artistic craft items under a blue tarp canopy along the side of the road. I asked him what he thought could be done to make life better for him on the reservation. He told me that if there was a Walmart closer than Chadron, (Chadron, NE, 47 miles away), his life would be easier because then he wouldn't have to drive so far and wouldn't cost him so much for gas to go get supplies to make the items he sells.
I was thinking that improvement of his life had to do with wealth and upgraded housing and food. In his mind, he was satisfied to do what he was doing and live where he was living, he just would like the process to be easier.
The moral to me was that I cannot judge another. I see the woman in the film changed her life with objects others thought were junk and didn't have to have a 'better" home to live differently, live better.
Thanks for reminding me of this valuable lesson and allowing me to share it here. Also for the great sketches.

Peace

susan said...

Maybe I'll lower my sights and just draw a 90 minute movie on flip pages.

susan said...

Thanks, Claire.

susan said...

There are a lot of well trained people much younger than me who can have those careers and good luck to them.

That's a nice story about the man you met in SD who was selling handicrafts. The only sad part is that he wished the Walmart was closer rather than that there were decent shops in a nearby town.

Peace.

jams o donnell said...

A story board sounds like a big thing to do. Good luck whichever way you choose to handle it!

susan said...

Too true, Jams. We shall see how it goes.

linda adelaide said...

i am so disappointed and mad at my connection-s l o w- making it impossible to watch ANY videos now. seems it is slower as they have more customers. why not put a few more satellites up with the cost of the damned thing-was my thought anyway...now we find out there is a new company owning the company we now use for our internet service so maybe it will be better. it is expensive as always and i wonder-with a two year commitment- is it worth it? well, IF IF IF it works. so frustrated today...i might add-again-to that.

your drawings are magical and i do have my own take on what "I" would do but cannot speak for you. seems that the inspiration for the words comes from the drawings but maybe not...for me, since you are not looking for another career, i would do what brings you the greatest sense of satisfaction and most importantly, joy, and leave the rest to life. you will know in time...in the meantime, don't get frustrated as these would be wonderful painted! i love your sense of whimsy and the little girl is a doll. you can see her fierce sense of determination so clearly in these. and the little dog? he's so loyal tho seemingly questioning of her wisdom but no matter! dogs being dogs;)

i suppose you have a point that there is literal village pumping out these animations, etc. pixar is a huge company of artists having a ball! can you imagine? anyway i love these no matter what you do with them.

and apologies i have been so vacant lately, i have had, shall we say, issues and interruptions and the sky falling on top of me much of the time. since it's all already happened, it cannot happen again. hmmm....
xoxoxoxo

susan said...

I'm sorry you can't watch the videos as well. Sometimes our cable company just drops us if we aren't clicking through pages fast enough and other times the company itself loses internet connection - and ours is expensive too. We recently dropped our phone company in favor of having phone and cable from one provider and they charged us $50 just to cancel. Nasty business these days.

I'm glad to like the little drawings even though they haven't added up to much yet. Yes, there's a fair amount of whimsy here but essentially I'm not a children's book artist. What you say lightens my heart. I'll write soon.

I'm sorry the issues and interruptions have been interfering with your peace of mind. Of course, that won't happen again ;-)
xoxoxo

Lisa Golden said...

Expressions, I tell you. EXPRESSIONS. And the implied motion. The dog's wagging tail, the legs kicking out. The finger on the lock.

susan said...

I wish you could see the expression on my face right now. :-) doesn't do it justice.