Thursday, May 8, 2014

spring rocks Halifax park


One day a few weeks ago, shortly after the last snow melted, we came across a rock maze that had been carefully laid out on the grass of Point Pleasant Park. It was probably 30 feet across and twenty deep. While my husband walked along its convolutions to the centre where there was a little rock shrine, I watched and wished I'd brought my camera - not to take a photo of him, but to record the result of the anonymous artist's effort. The maze hadn't been there the day before and by the next day the park maintenance crew had bulldozed its stones back to the rocky beach. After all, it will soon be time to cut the grass and you can't send lawn mowers over loose rocks. As Jer stooped to leave the last of our peanuts on the shrine he discovered a tiny red plastic frog another maze walker had left.


More recently we found the results of yet another spontaneous installation made from the rocks on that shore - yes, it's a very rocky shore. Today I took my camera.

There's something wonderful about artwork made from the materials contained in natural surroundings that shows what's best in us. That days can go by with nobody knocking down these precariously balanced sculptures is one of the things I love most about Halifax.

18 comments:

Andrew MacLaren-Scott said...

"That days can go by with nobody knocking down these precariously balanced sculptures is one of the things I love most about Halifax"

Good to hear (and to see). Although I do suspect alien robotic hands at work trying to tell you what they look like (obviously).

marja-leena said...

Such gorgeous photos, all that blue sky and these sentinels all in a row, so many of them! We see them here tow but usually just on one 'foot". Have you ever tried building one?

susan said...

Yes, Andrew, I think some hands on work by alien robots might be just the ticket right now.

susan said...

With the winds around here, Marja-Leena, my guess is the locals decided two feet are much more practical.

No, I've never built one, but the time might come. They're very cool.

Life As I Know It Now said...

This just proves there is art in everything around us, and we like to rearrange the pieces to reflect that. Nice pictures.

John Gray said...

Reminds me of Easter is,and...
Not that I have ever been!
Regards from over the pond

susan said...

and those of us with eyes to see are well compensated, yes?
I'm happy you liked the pictures, Lib.

susan said...

Even more so once you know the Easter Is. heads have bodies.
Not that I've been either..
Thanks for dropping by, John. I love your blog.

Should Fish More said...

I'm struck by how much work that must have taken, a team perhaps? The rock art consortium? Fine post and pictures.

Rob-bear said...

The sculptures rock, indeed. Taking them down was a tremendous inset to someone (or someones) who were trying to make something of beauty for others to enjoy. The banality of taking something down because some official didn't think it conformed to government standards is appalling.

Blessings and Bear hugs!

susan said...

You're right that it must have been a team. Some of the larger pieces were made using rocks that likely weigh a hundred pounds or more. Then again, there could have been one old magician using his powers of levitation. One never knows for sure.

Glad you liked the pictures, Mike. I enjoy taking them but rarely carry a camera.

susan said...

In case I wasn't clear, Rob, the maze that was removed was spread out over the grass near the rocky shore. Since it's a space used by walkers and picnickers we weren't surprised it was removed, just the speed at which it was done. The statues overlooking the water have been left alone by the authorities and everyone else.

Best wishes

Sean Jeating said...

Latest from now on you should try not to leave home without your camera.

susan said...

I should but it's bulky and interferes with peanut scatterings for our wild friends.

One thing, though, it's quicker than drawing a picture :)

Lindsay Byrnes said...

Hi Susan. I understand Point Pleasant Park is a wonderful area but with very mixed environmental outcomes. The slate looks ideal for building all manner of things as evidenced by the sculptures. I look forward to seeing more pictures of the park in the future , to complement those great pics you have already captured.
Best wishes

susan said...

Hi Lindsay,
I hope you enjoy the latest post :)
Fond regards

okjimm said...

cool beans! Nice that there was so much material to work with. Around here.......maybe cow manure...but then the sculpture would stink.

susan said...

Yeah, there is one heckuva lot of material down there. I just wish it would grind itself down to sand faster so I could so I could go paddling in the waves.

Maybe if the manure dried out a bit? Of course if it rained the problem might return.