Saturday, June 7, 2014

other people's work #97



I haven't done an 'other people's work' post for a long time, but the paintings Kim Alsbrook are really worth a look. The project, called My White Trash Family, are miniatures painted on pieces of flattened trash rather than the ivory or expensive linen canvasses such items of self regard usually decorated.

Although the portraits themselves are very beautiful, she has certainly brought the notions of privilege inherent in great wealth crashing down to earth. 



 " ... a clutch of beer cans ... crushed flat. On the surface of each was painted a bust dressed in 18th century collars and frocks, and posed as if standing for Gainsborough himself. The aristocratic air of the subject clashes with the disposability of the medium to create an exquisite tension suggesting volumes about the nature of family portraits and the value of art itself."

— Savannah Morning News Review   


Statement from Jesse Brass on Vimeo.
 


Thanks to Kuriositas


15 comments:

marja-leena said...

Wow. I see from her blog that these miniature portraits are of real people. Using trash is a very contemporary approach yet combined here with a historic style of portraiture - excellent!

susan said...

I thought it was a wonderful idea too, Marja-Leena. Gentle mockery is such a fine tool.

Should Fish More said...

Art comes in many guises and forms, eh? Quite nice.

Ol'Buzzard said...

Fantastic art with an open interpretation.
the Ol'Buzzard

susan said...

It always amazes me just how many creative people there are.

susan said...

It certainly does. Amazing just how many interesting artists there are.

susan said...

Yeah, no bashing over the head. I like that.

Sean Jeating said...

That's what I do call artistic.
Good find, Susan. Thanks for sharing.

Lindsay Byrnes said...

Hi Susan,
From flattened street trash to exquisite portraits in oils and varnish the artist has given a new meaning to “white trash” as her pictures are in stark contrast to those of privilege painted on ivory most likely from slain elephants.
Best wishes

susan said...

It was too neat to leave behind.
Glad you like it :)

susan said...

Hi Lindsay,
Yes, it's a perfect statement, isn't it? Says so much by saying nothing at all.
Best wishes

gfid said...

i love the juxtaposition of cultures.... throwaway culture / 'cultured portraits'.... and the artist's belief that the art is more important than any discussion of it.

Andrew MacLaren-Scott said...

Interesting

susan said...

I liked that part too.

susan said...

Nuff said :)