Friday, August 5, 2011

what next?


Just so you know I'm still here and not completely a ghost of the internets I thought I'd show you a new drawing. At the moment I'm not sure if he'll become a character in a painting whose form hasn't become clear to me or if this is just another of those images that come and go. The good thing about having a blog is that I can leave him here to graze in a place where someone may see him and wish they could pat his soft nose. I love horses. Just the sight of one reminds me of a simpler way of living that's been lost to most of us - at least for the time being.

I've been thinking about writing and drawing a story but just seeing shadows and glimpses instead of an entirety makes it difficult. I prefer being positive. I don't like conflict but struggle seems to be a major part of the reason we're here. If nothing bad ever happened we'd have little reason to talk to each other and certainly no cause for compassion.

Perhaps I should simply continue writing and drawing the Adventures and see what develops. Tiny steps when we're not strong enough for leaps and bounds will have to do.






In the meantime I made some more bracelets.

Now I've put the beads away for at least another ten years.
Sustained acts of compulsive behavior can make a person very tired.
They can also drive you crazy.
I think I may have figured out what's wrong with our culture.
There may be a story in it.

17 comments:

Vincent said...

What's wrong with our culture? Whose culture? Looking forward to that story. Seems to me the pictures to accompany it might be the hardest.

Yes, tiny steps may be all we can manage.

Is there a reason we're here? If so, is there a reason why spiders are here? It seems to me that we compulsively seek reasons just a spider compulsively spins webs. That quest is part of our struggle and if we don't have a good healthy struggle, we get prematurely sick, from any of a myriad forms of illness. Even drawing a nose-pattable horse is a struggle, I'm sure. Lovely result, anyhow! I shall offer him a carrot or an apple.

Struggle is in our blood, or as we say today, our DNA.

Sean Jeating said...

... if you steal the horse's h and replace it by a w, you get the tendency – if you prefer to be a pessimist.

jams o donnell said...

It is a delightful horse. I will be interested in seeing if it develops

Ooh I really hope that there is another Adventure. I loved your account of your debut as an artist's model

Ol'Buzzard said...

It is always uplifting to hit your blog - thanks
the Ol'Buzzard

marja-leena said...

Your drawings are always lovely (did you know I can't draw a horse?!), as are your beaded bracelets and your Adventures, so you don't need our permission to carry on as your heart desires, tiny steps will even do it. We'll be the beneficiaries when you do show and tell.

susan said...

vincent - I was certainly thinking about the bombast and dishonesty of the prevailing dominant. The idea of an overall solution is quite impossible to imagine, never mind convey, but knowledge and a deeper understanding of all that surrounds us is certainly a worthy goal.

So I'll keep to the tiny steps. Stories are more likely to appear when I draw; once there's a picture or two other things start coming to mind.

sean - Did you ever hear the story about the 500 year old hermit? He was reputed to have marvelous healing powers so the people who lived near the mountains where he was presumed to reside left offerings of flowers and food when they wanted his blessing. One day after the others had left a young man decided to wait in hiding for the hermit to appear. Hours went by and a bright moon shone down on the rock shelf where the food had been left by the time he glimpsed a swiftly moving shadow. Just as the old recluse retrieved the basket and turned to spring away the young man called out, 'Wait!' The hermit peered back from the top of cleft as the young man shouted his question, 'How have you lived so long?' When his words ceased to echo, a faint reply reverberated in the silence, 'I avoided people'.

jams - He is sweet, isn't he? I'm absolutely sure I remember an adventure or two involving horses.

ol'buzzard - Why, thank you. I really appreciated you saying so.

marja-leena - You can't? I bet you could if you wanted to. I've always been very glad you like what I do. I just wish sometimes I could work faster and maintain the quality. Adventure drawing is quite easy since I don't worry about getting things exactly right.. my impressionist state :-)

Sean Jeating said...

Had I been the hermit, Mylady, I'd - very propably :) – have regretted, had I avoided you.

Randal Graves said...

Why canst thou be a full-time cynick? A horse almost killed me once, but they're still pretty to watch scamper across the ever-more-dusty land as long as I don't have to ride them.

gfid said...

horses are fascinating. they have no real peers in the animal world, being unique in a dozen different ways. and the way they move is music of the muscles and bones.... with their own built in percussion section. and a culture that hasn't changed since before homo sapiens even knew they existed. there's so much we can learn from horses. and dogs. and cats. and geese. and amoeba.

what you said about not not worrying about getting everything right in the pictures in your stories..... the lines of those drawings are so very expressive, i can't imagine any NEED to worry. your impressionist state :0)

Linda said...

i agree with the small is best and most happy arrangement in the longest run, no?

i love your pony and just seeing him made me remember the feel of their noses, the warmth coming from their big nostrils...much love there.
thank you.♥

Steve Emery said...

I like the possibilities gestating in this post... (and the horse).

Like you I prefer to be positive - and fear often for the negative. Most often I focus my creative efforts on the fun, the colorful, and the beautiful. Escaping? Not sure. I know you're not - you seem to face your concerns. I don't know if I can do that - if I want to do that.

Gina said...

I've made the small step of trading anger in for disgust and bemusement. Words I use often to describe my state of mind when it comes to, as Susan put it, the dishonesty of the prevailing dominant. For me that is a very positive step, indeed. I keep going forward, a little at a time, and try to enjoy life while doing so. :-)

I am a bit afraid of horses up close. They are massive and a bit hard to relate to. I haven't been around them much, perhaps that is why I feel a bit shy. Yours, however, is very much one I could warm up to. :-)

What *is* next...we just have to keep going to find out, don't we...

Sending love.

susan said...

sean - How kind of you to say so, good Sir.

randal - I shouldst throwest inne yon towelle aynd embraseth cynosure entirrre yet alas and alack mine heart is sorrie sore.

I've had at least 2 horses try to kill me yet I also love them still - just from a bit further away these days.

gfid - They truly are magnificent beasts who make fine friends as well as elegant transport. If people had to groom their cars before and after each drive they might think twice about driving them 2 blocks for a bottle of milk and a lottery ticket.

I do have a much harder time drawing the things that generally surround me. There are far more cars, buses, and tacky buildings than there are horses and fields of flowers in my life. Thanks so much for the praise :-)

linda - Knowing when we have enough can be the most difficult thing to appreciate. I'm glad you like the pony. He just appeared with all his sweetness and trust intact.
xoxo

steve - I'll have to wait and see how it goes - I seem to have a harder time sitting down to draw when it's hot. And the paint dries too fast.

I get irritated with myself for not being able to illustrate angst. Some people can and some of them just overload on it too. I think it's good for us to be honest and work to the best of our abilities in hope our insights filter through.

gina - You just reminded me of an old favorite Elvis Costello song. The main refrain has always been a fitting statement about a number of things in our western culture. All we can do if we're to remain sane is to be aware of what's going on, yet enjoy the good things in life.

I'm absolutely going to have to write and draw at least one of my horse experience stories. They are pretty intimidating, yes, but oh so very beautiful.

Much love to you too.

Lisa said...

Well, your hands have not been idle! Nor has your mind, you tease.

susan said...

lisa - Like you, I'm rarely idle :-)

My problem is sometimes I wonder what the heck I've accomplished.

TheCunningRunt said...

That horse is indeed a beauty, and radiates a warmth of spirit.

My Susan is a horse-grrrl, and in her dealings with them is acutely aware of their power and wilfulness. She frequently warns me about my postures in relation to them, something about which I wouldn't think on my own.

I'd love to see where you go with this one.

susan said...

cr - I used to like to ride horses but living in cities doesn't allow for much of that. They are very big and powerful as well as being easily startled. Your Susan is wise.